Anne Imhof

Body language

AI045d_DrawingforRage_CMYK.jpg

Zeichnung für Rage I, 2014, Aquarell und Filzstift auf Papier (alle Bilder courtesy: die Künstlerin & Deborah Schamoni, Munich)

Drawing for Rage I, 2014, Watercolour and marker on paper (all images courtesy: the artist & Deborah Schamoni, Munich)

When discussing the performative range of Anne Imhof’s works, vocabulary seems an appropriate starting term. Imhof’s performances are complex, intimate studies in movement, gesture and action, mostly silent and tending to span several hours. The works accumulate as a private corporeal lexicon shared by a small group of performers – often the artist’s friends and peers – whose ongoing rehear­sals collectivize charac­te­rizations of being a ‘non-person’ (and have even incorporated animals such as a live donkey or rabbits). ‘Body language’, a key component in Imhof’s pieces, is after all physical communication.

At points in Rage 1, which debuted as part of Imhof’s self-titled exhibition at Deborah Schamoni in Munich last spring, fractured snippets of speech and spoken word were combined with nonverbal interactions, all performed under harsh, sodium light. In the work, performers moved carefully around the space, seemingly intent on their own activities while appearing almost apparitional — expressionless, in non-descript, casual attire. At times they came together in pairs or as a group. Watching this, one began to sense a loss of time – duration without peaks or culmination. Communication is broken down and formalized in Imhof’s static works too, from her objects to her drawings and paintings. In the same show immateriality was given heft, the works taken as a whole creating an abstract poem of sorts. Several two-dimensional pieces were simply titled after letters from the alphabet, such as Y (2014), in which the character is etched in reverse onto the black surface of dibond like the impression of a key across the side of a car. Curiously, the etching’s stick-like form bears a passing resemblance to the rune Kaun, from the Younger Futhark runic alphabet, which stands for ulcer, wound or ope­ning and in rune-casting can represent ‘insight gained by suffering’.

While runes are attributed as the root of Germanic languages, certain works in the exhibition also alluded anatomically to the mouth as a point of origin – of speech and of action. For example, the toothbrushes and orthodontic headgear that figure in the sculptural assemblages Untitled and Cobra Toothbrush (both 2014) signify regularity and practice (the brushing of teeth), and self-improvement through surgical restructuring. Installed in the garden behind the gallery, a clay tongue protruded from a surface of buttermilk, the liquid filling a concrete basin in Unten Unten Unten Hollow Whale (2014), and for Tongue (2014) the muscle is carved out of a slab of alabaster and rested disembodied and mute on the floor. Through this Imhof extends the role of performativity to the materials usually seen as the remainder or by-product of performance itself – props like stacks of energy drinks or filmed documentation and slideshows. As such, the vocabulary of the discipline, which usually focuses on ‘liveness’, is broadened to cover a range of materials and media.

02_DEAL_CMYK.jpg

DEAL, 2015, Performanceansicht, MoMA PS1, New York, (mit Franziska Aigner, Lauren Bakst, Billy Bultheel, Frances Chiaverini, Ian Edmonds, Niall Jones, Mickey Mahar, Olga Pedan, Justin Tate und Lea Welsch; Fotografie: Nadine Fraczkowski)

DEAL, 2015, Performance view, MoMA PS1, New York, (with Franziska Aigner, Lauren Bakst, Billy Bultheel, Frances Chiaverini, Ian Edmonds, Niall Jones, Mickey Mahar, Olga Pedan, Justin Tate and Lea Welsch; photograph: Nadine Fraczkowski)

When I spoke with Imhof about DEAL, her most recent and ambitious long-form performance to date which took place over two days and across two separate spaces at New York’s MoMA PS1 in early 2015, the artist talked of ‘infection instead of infinity’ in reference to its duration. Incorporating elements from previous performances the work unfolded in time at a slower pace than the individual works had been performed. In DEAL, performers transport buttermilk between two concrete basins similar to Unten Unten Unten Hollow Whale, which this time functioned more like a trough than a purely sculptural object. The gelatinous white liquid passed amongst the participants, stuck to their clothes, got in their hair and dripped from their fingertips – infecting them. Like language the work relied on transference from one body to another. It spoke to symbolic exposure, of contagion and protection; of physical receptacles and of orifices for contamination.

Given their durational aspect, how would one situate Imhof’s performances in terms of endurance, a persistent staple of the medium, and in light of recent disputes among its established practitioners? In 2011, Yvonne Rainer penned an open letter to former LA MoCA director Jeffrey Deitch calling Marina Abramović’s plans to install rotating naked performers in the middle of tables for the duration of a fundraiser a ‘grotesque spectacle’. In Imhof’s performances, tolerance is less about putting the body under duress or pushing it to limits that border on abuse, but rather about involving others in the choreography of her works. One is affronted by clandestine actions – a repeated shaking of a clenched fist or a body bent over – and the nearly private language of the performers’ gestures. While labour-intensive for those involved, Imhof exploits the expectation that activity means production, generating instead a feeling of ‘wasted time’. As such, the works seem as if they would continue regardless of an audience. Ongoing improvisations evolve within these pieces in place of a rigid structure. In a sense, their participants are more akin to a self-organised troupe, company or band working together instead of being ‘employed’ as workers. Whilst it might be applied as a subtext in her work, Imhof broaches the expectation of per­formance – the ‘promise’ in its delivery – as it has been canonized. Hers is a physical language broken down and cut loose of its historical restraints.

Saim Demircan is a curator and writer based in Berlin, Germany. He is currently curator-in-residence at the Academy of Fine Art in Munich. 

Issue 19

First published in Issue 19

May 2015

Most Read

Ei Arakawa work stolen from Skulptur Projekte Münster; Richard Mosse arrested; three men charged over counterfeit...
Joyce Pensato, Landscape Mickey, 2017. Courtesy: Lisson Gallery, London
Lisson Gallery, London, UK
Coinciding with Refugee Week, and her film Hear Her Singing screening at the Southbank Centre, the artist shares some...
Gilda Williams visits the first edition of the ARoS Triennial in Aarhus, Denmark
The Haitian Revolution as a lesson in corporate leadership and meeting the 'prophet of the Anthropocene': what to read...
Creative Time launches series of protest flags; photographer Khadija Saye reported as a victim of London's Grenfell...
A recent retrospective at the Museo Ettore Fico in Turin establishes the overlooked importance of a ‘total artist’
The third edition of the London performance festival makes the case for collective action in an age of political...
A past winner of the Frieze Writer’s Prize, Zoe Pilger on the books and experiences that have influenced her as a writer
A guide to the best projects included in Skulptur Projekte Münster 2017
For the first in a series of our editors’ initial impressions from documenta 14 Kassel, Pablo Larios on the Neue...
Art sees itself as facing a crisis of legitimation – can this account for claims to 'authenticity' being made in shows...

An interview with the late artist on the unique classification system he devised to organize his books
The independent curator on 25 years in the arts

Latest Magazines

frieze magazine

April 2017

frieze magazine

May 2017

frieze magazine

June – August 2017