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Briefing

Parisian museum comes under fire for its descriptions of slavery; free art school OSE relocates from London to the coast

detail_of_a_poster_for_the_color_line_2016_curated_by_daniel_soutif_musee_du_quai_branly_-_jacques_chirac_paris

Detail of a poster for 'The Color Line', 2016, curated by Daniel Soutif, musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac, Paris

Detail of a poster for 'The Color Line', 2016, curated by Daniel Soutif, musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac, Paris

  • The musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac in Paris has come under fire for its current exhibition ‘The Color Line’, curated by Daniel Soutif, which aims to question: ‘What role did art play in the quest for equality and the affirmation of black identity in segregated America?’ In a pamphlet that accompanies the exhibition, the lives of a number of slaves are described as ‘pleasant’ – there are also claims that racial discrimination in the US ended in 1964.
     
  • Open School East (OSE), a London-based art school established in 2013 that offers free tuition and workspace for artists, is moving out of the city to establish a new space in Margate, Kent. In addition to this, the organization is in the process of fundraising for a new studio complex that will open in 2018 in North Woolwich, in the London borough of Newham, in partnership with the non-profit organisation Create London.
     
  • Adrian Rosenfeld, the former director of Matthew Marks gallery, is set to establish his own gallery in San Francisco. The new space, which will take Rosenfeld’s name, will be located at 1150 25th St., next door to new home of Altman Siegel Gallery, which is slated to open on 11 November.
     
  • The significantly delayed M+ museum, set to be the centrepiece of the new West Kowloon Cultural District in Hong Kong, has received a donation of five works from local collector Hallam Chow. The works donated are by Jun Nguyen-Hatsushiba, L.N. Tallur, Sopheap Pich, Jompet Kuswidananto, and Eko Nugroho. M+, which upon completion will be twice the size of London’s Tate Modern, is expected to open by 2019, two years later than originally planned.
     
  • New York’s JTT gallery is preparing to move from its space on Suffolk Street to a new location at 191 Chrystie on the Lower East Side. Jasmin Tsou, who founded the space in 2012, said: ‘Moving was inevitable as we only have three hundred square feet of exhibition space at our current location. I’m extremely proud of the ambitious projects we exhibited over the past years . . . some bodies of work, however, simply would have been disserviced by such a small gallery.’
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