Stage Presents

The director Milo Rau and his theatrical hyper-allegories

Die_Zürcher_Prozesse_8__c__Markus_TomscheIm-Bild-Die-Geschworenen-und-Eröffnungsredner-Jürg-Ramspeck_CMYK.jpg

Milo Rau, Die Zürcher Prozesse, 2013, Performance, Theater Neumarkt, Zürich, Fotografie: © Markus Tomsche

Milo Rau, Die Zürcher Prozesse, 2013, Performance, Theater Neumarkt, Zurich, Photograph: © Markus Tomsche

It is a truism that parliamentary debates or court proceedings are always also pieces of theatre. Reality theatre groups like Rimini Protokoll and cultural critics like Jean Baudrillard have helped raise awareness, within the cultural sector at least, of the aestheticization of public and private life, and of their gradual blurring. So when the Cologne-based Swiss director, writer and theorist Milo Rau stages or restages court cases with casts including ‘real’ public figures, as he has been doing for several years, his aim is certainly not to highlight the grey areas between reality and fiction. He has other concerns: ‘as I understand it, theatre is not an information medium, and it’s not an educational medium, it’s a medium for the present or, rather, for presenting the present.’

Die_Zürcher_Prozesse_1__c__Markus_Tomsche_CMYK.jpg

Milo Rau, Die Zürcher Prozesse, 2013, Performance, Theater Neumarkt, Zürich, Fotografie: © Markus Tomsche

Milo Rau, Die Zürcher Prozesse, 2013, Performance, Theater Neumarkt, Zurich, Photograph: © Markus Tomsche

Born in Bern in 1977, Rau came to prominence with his reenactments of political events like the fall of the Ceausescu regime in Romania in 1989 (Die letzten Tage der Ceausescus, The Last Days of the Ceausescus, 2009–10) or a broadcast on the Rwandan Radio-Télévision Libre des Mille Collines whose bizarre hate propaganda helped trigger the genocide of 1994 (Hate Radio, 2011–2). In March 2013, this was followed by the staging of a court case at the Sakharov Centre in Moscow with participants including Pussy Riot member Yekaterina Samutsevich and staunchly conservative journalist Maxim Shevchenko. The subject of the proceedings was freedom of speech in Putin’s Russia.

Ceausescu-3_CMYK.jpg

Milo Rau, Die letzen Tage der Ceausescus, 2009–10, HAU, Berlin, Fotografie: © Karl-Bernd Karwasz

Milo Rau, Die letzen Tage der Ceausescus, 2009–10, HAU, Berlin, Photograph: © Karl-Bernd Karwasz

In all of these performances, Rau’s message is that conflicts are never past. They are endlessly present; eternally returning. When jaded Europeans think they can withdraw to a post-historical comfort zone, they devote themselves to a state once fittingly described by the philosopher Leszek Kołakowski as a ‘culture of analgesics’ in the ‘cosy atmosphere of harmony that always prevails where no one has any concerns’. The target of Rau’s endeavours is precisely the hypocrisy displayed by the advocates of political correctness who ignore centres of conflict until they go up in flames. His choice of theatre to criticize such false harmony makes sense. Hegel called theatre an ‘art of performance’ and a ‘real and present action’ in which ‘execution’ outshines representation. As such, Rau’s productions can be described in terms of ‘creating striking present’ (Martin Seel) or ‘producing events of emergence’ (Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht).

HateRadio_HAU2-15.5_.12__MG_2243_DanielSeiffert(c)_32_CMYK_.jpg

Milo Rau, Hate Radio, 2011–2 HAU, Berlin, Fotografie: © Daniel Seiffert

Milo Rau, Hate Radio, 2011–2 HAU, Berlin, Photograph: © Daniel Seiffert

In May this year, Rau took on the Swiss magazine Die Weltwoche, staging a show trial at Zurich’s Theater Neumarkt, Die Zürcher Prozesse (The Zurich Process, 2013), on the following charges as listed in Switzerland’s criminal code: §258: scaring the population; §261: racial discrimination; §275: attack on the constitutional order. Since 2001, under editor Roger Köppel, Die Weltwoche has been pursuing a controversial far-right approach, not stopping at the use of demagogical means – in particular its front page images. These have included a Romany child threateningly pointing a pistol into the camera, and a defamation of the (admittedly obscure) Biel-based Islamist Nicolas Blancho as ‘Bin Laden in Biel’.

More than 30 public figures from Switzerland and abroad took part in the trial: writers, politicians, lawyers, publishers, academics, ordinary citizens. And Rau’s aim ‘to highlight the central lines of conflict in our society over the past decade’ was actually achieved. As he put it: ‘the Die Weltwoche is a pretext to think about Switzerland’. The cracks in the notion of bucolic ‘Swissness’ were clearly visible. At one point, Blancho compared Köppel with Joseph Goebbels, proving his ability to match Die Weltwoche where populism is concerned. And Daniel Zingg, representing the Christian lobby group Gegen die strategische Islamisierung der Schweiz (Against the Strategic Islamization of Switzerland), made generous use of platitudes, as when he reduced Christianity to the gospels’ message of love and Islam to bellicose poli­ti­cal rhetoric. For the defence, the controversial lawyer Valentin Landmann gave a particularly distinguished performance. For the prosecution, Marc Spescha from the left-wing camp was unable to score many points. And so, unsurprisingly, the jury returned a verdict of not guilty.

Rau’s mission, then, is to present the present or the recent past whose effects are still being felt. This presenting of the present implies that it is not sufficiently present to us; that it merely passes us by and therefore must be exemplified and explicated. Rau wants to shake up a media culture in which provocation has become a narcotic commodity and in which the injection of the real into art – previously considered avant-garde – has been taken over by the rise of reality TV. This sounds like a classically left-wing position, and in a recent interview Rau described himself as ‘much more left-wing than most on the left in terms of my willingness to fight’.

To date, Rau is not known to have engaged in any forms of combat outside the arenas of art and discourse. He may cultivate a gruff image with full beard and leather jacket, he may have founded a production company called International Institute of Political Murder, but his sphere of action is confined to the sheltered realms of the stage and of discourse. Instead of direct agitation, he privileges procedures that might boldly be termed ‘theatrical hyper-assemblage’ or ‘theatrical hyper-allegory’.

Artists like Kurt Schwitters once took found fragments from the totality of everyday reality, mounting them on pictures and thus removing them from their usual contexts of meaning and function. Contrasting it with symbols, which promote unity, Walter Benjamin referred to this principle as ‘allegory’. Rau removes found fragments of contemporary history from their media contexts, dramatizing and focusing them on the stage. This is done not with the aim of attributing new meaning to any given fragment, but, on the contrary, in order to make them accessible again in their specific, contemporary context that is drowned out by the everyday hullabaloo of the media. ‘Where waffle was, discourse there shall be’ to borrow Freud’s addage. Ultimately, Rau’s productions are affirmative forms of what Baudrillard analyzed in negative terms as ‘hyperreality’. Rau seems to believe that to realize reality properly, and especially media reality, it needs to be re-staged.

Jörg Scheller is an art historian, journalist and musician. He teaches at Zurich University of the Arts.

Issue 10

First published in Issue 10

Jun – Aug 2013

Most Read

Ahead of Berlin Gallery Weekend, a guide to what to see across the German capital
Ahead of Art Cologne this week, a guide to the best current shows in the city
A fresh dispute over the estate of Vivian Maier; Chris Ofili is made a CBE
Theaster Gates & The Black Monks of Mississippi’s latest project for IHME Festival, Helsinki
Barkley L. Hendricks has died; the Tate faces a lawsuit from its neighbours

From Egyptian surrealism to Parisian pissoirs: what to read this weekend
On the 2017 Jamaica Biennial and its attempts to confront the role of misogyny in Jamaican popular culture
Jan Bonny and Alex Wissel’s new film project, ‘Rheingold’, sends up the ethical superiority of art making versus...
Jason Rhoades, My Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage..., 2004, mixed media, dimensions variable. Courtesy: Hauser & Wirth Los Angeles, The Estate of Jason Rhoades and David Zwirner; photograph: Fredrik Nilsen
Hauser & Wirth, Los Angeles, USA
Ahead of Art Brussels opening this week, a guide to the best shows around town
Recently awarded a USA Artist Fellowship, Lynn Hershman Leeson speaks about cultural technologies, personal narratives...
Cosey Fanni Tutti talks to Paul Clinton about feminism, freedom and the politics of the personal
David Zwirner, New York
A guide to the best of the current and soon-to-open shows in London
The final part in a series of our editors’ initial impressions from documenta 14 Athens, Amy Sherlock on the fourth and...
A survey of more than 50 respondents from over 30 countries

Latest Magazines

frieze magazine

Jan - Feb 2017

frieze magazine

March 2017

frieze magazine

April 2017