Spotlight

Charles Hinman

Marc Straus, New York (S31)

Charles Hinman, Amoo, 1971, acrylic on shaped canvas, 139.5 × 203 cm. Courtesy: Marc Straus, New York

Charles Hinman, Amoo, 1971, acrylic on shaped canvas, 139.5 × 203 cm. Courtesy: Marc Straus, New York

Marc Straus presents work by pioneer of hard-edged abstraction and shaped canvases, Charles Hinman. Included are five paintings from 1964-1971, an extraordinary and innovative period early in Hinman’s career.

This seven-year period captures Hinman as an emerging artist. These works are elegant investigations of space and perception.

Charles Hinman (b. 1932, Syracuse; lives and works in New York) first garnered attention in 1964 with his inclusion in the Seven New Artists exhibition at Sidney Janis Gallery. That same year his first solo show was held at Richard Feigen Gallery, a sold-out show with works going to MoMA, the Albright-Knox Gallery, and the Rockefeller Collection. In 1965 he was included in the landmark exhibition Young America at The Whitney, and soon after in Henry Geldzahler and Frank Stella's seminal exhibition, Shape and Structure, alongside Donald Judd, Robert Morris, and Carl Andre. He was a prominent fixture in national surveys throughout the late sixties, such as Whitney Annuals and Pittsburg Internationals. By the mid-1970s he was increasingly less visible, and is now largely unknown to most of the current active collectors and curators. He continued to innovate and expand his vocabulary through the decades, making compelling new works until health issues intervened three years ago.