Spotlight

Eleanore Mikus

Craig F. Starr Gallery, New York (S13)

Eleanore Mikus, Tablet 180, 1967-68, Acrylic on fiberglass, 181 × 166 × 4 cm, Courtesy: Craig F. Starr Gallery. Photo by Dan Bradica

Eleanore Mikus, Tablet 180, 1967-68, Acrylic on fiberglass, 181 × 166 × 4 cm, Courtesy: Craig F. Starr Gallery. Photo by Dan Bradica

Craig F. Starr Gallery presents a selection of groundbreaking monochromatic work by American artist Eleanore Mikus. Both early (black, white, and gray) and late (more colorful) works will be featured by this seminal figure in the history of Minimalist art.

Best known for her Tablet paintings and paperfolds, Mikus’s work makes a continued investigation of light, shadow, line, composition, and temporality. In the early 1960s, Mikus began developing a series of paintings she called Tablets – hybrids of painting and relief. Using the studio floor as her workspace, Mikus built up and glued together roughly sawed pieces wood. Their surfaces were gessoed, and their sides beveled. Over the course of several weeks or months, Mikus would repeat the process of painting and sanding until she felt she had achieved the desired effect: luminous, smooth surfaces that also cast variable, real-life shadows.

Eleanore Mikus (b.1927, Detroit; d. 2018, Ithaca, New York) has work held in the collections of the National Gallery of Art (Washington D.C.), the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) (New York), among others.