Focus

Nazgol Ansairnia, Kamrooz Aram, Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck and Maryam Hoseini

Kamrooz Aram, Ancient Through Modern, An Uncertain Record for Future Nostalgia, 2016. Courtesy: the artist and Green Art Gallery, Dubai

Kamrooz Aram, Ancient Through Modern, An Uncertain Record for Future Nostalgia, 2016. Courtesy: the artist and Green Art Gallery, Dubai

Green Art Gallery presents a curated section of new works by artists Nazgol Ansarinia, Kamrooz Aram, Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck and Maryam Hoseini.

Hoseini captures empty historical echoes as bodies walk among the literal and figurative, the visible and invisible ruins of objects and architectures.

Ruins, and the line between construction and destruction are also reflected in the work of Nazgol Ansarinia. In her new ceramic sculptures and works on paper she analyses Tehran’s rapid growth by turning urban developments or regulations inside-out, dissecting and studying them, to reveal a collective consciousness.

Architecture and art and their relationship to a glorious past are highlighted in the work of Kamrooz Aram. His painterly works transcend the specter of the decorative, blending patterns derived from Persian carpets with geometric patterns common in vernacular modern European architecture. Aram challenges the viewer to consider the exhibition space as an architectural whole. Using exhibition design as a unifying form, he dismantles the hierarchy between the objects on display, the mechanisms of display such as pedestals, and the architecture of the space itself. He will present a work from the series “Ancient Blue Ornament” where paintings are shown alongside replicas of ornamental architectural details from Persepolis.

In Balteo-Yazbeck’s most recent work, he brings a critical focus to “the state of things” in contemporary society, in which “the human” has been abandoned up to the point where unmistakably unjust and painful circumstances are understood as the mechanisms of institutional structures that only care to maintain their own continuity. The works “poetically document”, by oscillating between abstraction and realism. They refer to abstract modernist Venezuelan art and to objective and conceptualist tendencies; thematically indicating the instrumentality of art, people and social customs that through diverse geopolitical and economic causes, the systems of power abandon, discard or marginalize after the completion of certain functions. These critical works could simultaneously refer to the many specific realities in today’s world.

Kamrooz Aram’s diverse practice often engages the complicated relationship between traditional non-Western art and Western Modernism. Kamrooz Aram (born 1978, Shiraz, Iran) received his MFA from Columbia University in 2003. Recent and upcoming solo and two-person exhibitions include: FOCUS: Kamrooz Aram, The Modern Art Museum of Forth Worth, Texas, USA (2018); Ancient Blue Ornament, Atlanta Contemporary, Atlanta, GA, USA (2018); Select group exhibitions include: Le Musée Imaginaire, Pavillion Trab, Jaou Tunis, Tunisia (2018); Aram is the winner of the Abraaj Group Art Prize 2014; He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Nazgol Ansarinia’s work examines the systems and networks that underpin her daily life such as everyday objects, routines, events and experiences, and the relationship they form to a larger social context, she lives and works in Tehran, Iran. Select exhibitions include: The Spark is You, Curated by Ziba Ardalan, 58thVenice Biennale, Venice, Italy (2019) (forthcoming); Remnants, curated by Sara Alonso Gómez, Green Art Gallery, Dubai, UAE (2018) (forthcoming); Slice and Dice, curated by Gregory Lang, Iréne Laub Gallery, Brussles, Belgium (2018) (forthcoming); Starting from the Desert. Ecologies on the Edge, Yinchuan Biennale, Yinchuan, China (2018).

Since the mid-nineties Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck has developed a hybrid practice that incorporates the activities of a researcher, archivist, historian and curator. Working across various mediums, his productions formally resemble or incorporate the works of others, stressing notions of authorship and cultural authority. Solo exhibitions include: Instrumentalized, Carmen Araujo Arte, Caracas, Venezuela (2018); Instrumentalized, Green Art Gallery, Dubai, UAE (2018); Diplomatic Entanglements, at Rochester Art Center, Rochester, MN (2015). He has been included in numerous group exhibitions including most recently: Everything Is Connected: Art and Conspiracy, The Met Breuer, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, USA (2018) (forthcoming); Parapolitics: Cultural Freedom and the Cold War, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, Germany (2017); 4.543 billion. The matter of matter, CAPC Musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France (2017); Colourless Green Ideas Sleep Furiously, curated by David Upton.

Maryam Hoseini (born 1988, Tehran, Iran) currently lives and works in New York. In her work, Maryam Hoseini explores the concept of ruins in a politicized social space. Hoseini captures empty historical echoes as bodies walk among the literal and figurative, the visible and invisible ruins of objects and architectures. In the context of the censored female figure, Hoseini presents her subjects as nude, cast simultaneously as unrealistically flattened diagrams of the human body, and hyperrealistic disembodied limbs covered in hair. Solo and group exhibitions include: Body Armor, MoMA PS1, New York, USA (2018); Of Strangers and Parrots, Rachel Uffner Gallery, NY, USA (2017); Sedentary Fragmentation, Heaven Gallery, Chicago, IL, USA (2017).