Spotlight

Paul Nash

Piano Nobile, London (S22)

Paul Nash, The Landscape Through the Window and Through the Looking Glass, 1945, Pencil and watercolour on paper, 40 × 57.5 cm. Courtesy: PIANO NOBILE, London

Paul Nash, The Landscape Through the Window and Through the Looking Glass, 1945, Pencil and watercolour on paper, 40 × 57.5 cm. Courtesy: PIANO NOBILE, London

Piano Nobile presents works on paper by seminal British artist, Paul Nash, including so of his finest Surrealist works produced during the First World War. The booth is co-curated with David Boyd Haycock, curator and author of A Crisis of Brilliance: Five Young British Artists of the Great War.

Nash was one of the twentieth century’s most significant modernist painters. His work ingeniously drew together a Surrealist impulse with strong references to the Romantic tradition of J.M.W. Turner. The stand will survey three major phases of Nash’s career, ranging from remarkable depictions of no man’s land in the First World War to plaintive, post-war works depicting the sea wall at Dymchurch. Following the recent centennial commemorations marking the end of the War, the display will make a poignant, historically alert contribution to the fair. This will follow the gallery’s highly successful exhibition first held in 2014, Paul Nash: Another Life, Another World, and recent major exhibitions.

Paul Nash (b. 1889, London; d. Bournemouth, UK, 1946) emerged as a leading modernist in 1934 after establishing Unit One, an artistic movement which included Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore. Nash was sent to the Western Front as an infantry officer in early 1917, later becoming an official war artist. Despite strong holdings in American private collections, US museums only have a handful of works by Nash, and the display will reintroduce the artist to an American audience.