Frame

Takahiko Iimura

Microscope Gallery, New York (F3)

Takahiko Iimura, Film Installation, 1974. Courtesy: the artist and Microscope Gallery, New York

Takahiko Iimura, Film Installation, 1974. Courtesy: the artist and Microscope Gallery, New York

Takahiko Iimura (born 1937) lives in Tokyo and New York.

Since the 1960s, Takahiko Iimura has explored film projection technologies and video playback, approaching them as materials for often paradoxical or absurdist films, videos, installations and performances. His work frequently investigates media through the concepts of duality, identity, and semiotics, and has been associated with Fluxus.

Positioned at the intersection of minimalist sculpture and cinema, Film Installation (1974) is one of the earliest installations utilizing celluloid film as an object. Its title is deceptive, setting expectations for a moving image projection piece that are never fulfilled. Film Installation was first exhibited in the US at P.S.1 in 1979, and has not been exhibited since. It reflects Iimura’s longtime interest in exposing the apparatus of projection, shifting the focus from the image on screen to the tools and mechanisms that enable it. Iimura pushes this concept to its extreme by removing the elements of light and projection completely.

Takahiko Iimura is a Japanese artist known for his pioneering work with film, video, installation, performance, and digital technologies, spanning more than 50 years. He arrived in New York in the mid-1960s after critical attention to his 1962 film, AI (Love), soundtracked by Yoko Ono. His work is regularly presented internationally and was recently featured in exhibitions in the US at Sculpture Center, the Whitney Museum, and MIT List, Cambridge, MA.