Spotlight

Waldo Balart

Galeria Casado Santapau, Madrid

Waldo Balart, Untitled, 1978, Acrylic and collage on paper, 41 × 41 × 2 cm. Courtesy: Casado Santapau Gallery, Madrid

Waldo Balart, Untitled, 1978, Acrylic and collage on paper, 41 × 41 × 2 cm. Courtesy: Casado Santapau Gallery, Madrid

Galeria Casado Santapau presents important works on paper from the 1970s by Cuban artist Waldo Balart, in the artist’s signature Concrete style.

Balart’s work seeks to create a formal visual language rooted in abstraction, concerned with color, planes, space, and order. He considers his plastic works to be “Aesthetic Messages.” He calls his pictures “Propositions” because through them he proposes a sensible, original and unique solution in which form and meaning are joined, without reference to object or reality. For Balart, light is the origin of color, and color is its quality. At the same time, colors are the structure of light measured in wave length and frequencies. He uses basic geometric forms in his plastic language. He aims to use standardized forms to bring out relevance in color and interaction among different components of the “Proposotion.” Form becomes secondary. Core to Balart’s painting is a drive for formal simplicity and a striking sense of color. A master of crisp lines and contrasting chromatic planes, Balart creates symmetry, asymmetry and an infinite variety of movement, rhythm and spatial tension across the canvas.

Waldo Balart (b. 1931, Cuba; lives and works in Madrid) moved to New York to pursue his art studies in 1959. From 1959-62 he studied at the art school at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). Balart moved to Madrid in 1970.