Spotlight

Yüksel Arslan

Galerist and Galeri Nev (S4)

Yüksel Arslan, Arture 439, L’Homme III, 1992, Mixed media, natural materials and crayon, ink on paper, 70 × 109.5 cm. Courtesy: the artist, Galeri Nev and Galerist

Yüksel Arslan, Arture 439, L’Homme III, 1992, Mixed media, natural materials and crayon, ink on paper, 70 × 109.5 cm. Courtesy: the artist, Galeri Nev and Galerist

Galerist and Galeri Nev present the visceral work of Turkish artist, philosopher, thinker, sage, heavy laborer, sourcerer and engraver, Yüksel Arslan. Ten pieces will be featured from his most established series, Man and Influences, which relentlessly questions the origins of humans and their relationship to nature.

Arslan’s work resembles drawings of Renaissance engineers, early scientific studies, old miniature paintings, and pre-historic cave painting; owing to his subtle color palette. Working like an archaeologist, Arslan gathers and uses vegetable dyes, earth, bone powder, honey, blood, urine, glue, grated soap, the juice of herbs and tobacco, egg white and other natural materials.

He has composed the images of a new “Art(h)urian” legend with the frenzy of a laborer and the nonchalance of a king in exile. His ideas are conceptualized in his “Artures,” a term he devised for his works, and which altogether make up the artist’s codex. The body of works presented are but a glimpse into the complex imagery of Arslan. His in-depth studies allow him to visualize mans’ mental and physical struggles. He draws the most explicit components of his chosen subjects in meticulous detail, and combies them with referential texts to emphasize his ideas. Arslan’s clever allusions to the writers, poets, and philosophers he admires constitute a major part of his artures. 

Yüksel Arslan (b. 1933, Istanbul; d. 2017, Paris) cultivated his technique during a period in Anatolia from 1953-54. He moved to Paris in 1961.