Explore previous Frieze Fairs

Since 2003, Frieze Fairs have presented the world’s most exciting artists, bringing leading galleries alongside artists’ projects, talks, sound and film commissions and more. Watch, listen and explore in our online archive.

Film

Launched in 2007, Frieze Film is a series of new film commissions premiered annually at Frieze London.

Film

From the rise of mass religion to Justin Bieber and megachurch gatherings

Film

Focusing on the material erupted by volcanoes and it’s ability to immobilize and bury

Film

The London-based collective presents Message of the Forest

Film

New commissions by The Otolith Group, Paul Pfeiffer and Lucy Raven 

Film

Highly influential American artist Alex Bag subverts the vocabularies of advertising, music videos and reality TV to critique today’s neo-liberal structures

Film

Peopled with hybrid and sexually charged beings, the meditative video works of the Icelandic artist are fed by Nordic sagas and irrational drives

Film
Photo credit: Andrea Avezzu

Mixing pop culture with elements of Surrealism, the French artist's theatrical films take history or myth as their points of departure to create a ‘patchwork narration’

Film

Using a drone to film her own body from a ‘hornet perspective’, the German artist questions the fe/male gaze, and how technology interferes with the physical self.

Film
Samson Kambalu, Dancer in the Woods, 2014, digital video, colour, 34 sec

The artist's new work from his series of spontaneous site-specific performances

Film
Rachel Maclean, The Lion and The Unicorn, 2012 (still)

Hyper-saturated videos unfold narratives through characters that quote classic films

Film
Shana Moulton, ‘Whispering Pines’ (2002–)

A series investigating the West’s fascination with esotericism and New Age philosophy

Film
Ming Wong, Aku Akan Bertahan / I Will Survive (production still), 2015. Three-channel video installation, running time variable. Courtesy the artist, Vitamin Creative Space, Guangzhou and carlier | gebauer, Berlin
 

Explorations of identity and gender in a re-working of classic European arthouse cinema