frieze magazine

Issue 187

May 2017

The May issue of frieze features an essay by Judith Clarke on the work of Rei Kawakubo and Comme des Garçons, ahead of an exhibition devoted to the designer opening at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art on 4 May. Ahead of the Venice Biennale, Tanya Harrod looks at the sculptures of Phyllida Barlow (representing Britain) and Dan Fox examines the social paintings of Mark Bradford (US Pavilion).  Also in the issue, Jace Clayton discusses the work of Ian Cheng, currently on show at MoMA PS1; we profile Hiwa K, who is included in this year’s documenta 14; and Ellen Mara de Wachter explores how artists are visualizing a world in which borders no longer define who we are. Plus 39 reviews from 24 cities, including the 2017 Whitney Biennial and Raymond Pettibon at the New Museum.

Callicoon Fine Arts and New Museum, New York, USA 

 

Yoshua Okón, Miasma, 2016, video stills. Courtesy: the artist and Parque Galería

On the eve of his first survey exhibition, Yoshua Okón talks to Magalí Arriola about Mexico, CIA covert ops, globalization and a derelict statue of

A new album by theatre group Object Collection warns against political nostalgia 

Why can the grotesque teach us about absurdity in life and art?

Conspiracy theories and reparative reading

Egyptian surrealism: a case-study in global modernity 

Art in the age of climate change

Charles Atlas, Untitled and undated image supplied by the artist. Courtesy: the artist

Q: What should stay the same? A: Change.

Ian Cheng, Emissary in the Squat of Gods, 2015, video still

Jace Clayton discovers hyper-intelligent dogs and violent humans in the artist’s computer-simulated worlds

Can we compare our current political moment to the tumultuous 1930s?

An image of the sole survivor tree after the 2011 tsunami in Japan 

Christopher Kulendran Thomas in collaboration with Annika Kuhlmann, New Eelam, 2017, exhibition view at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin. Courtesy: the artist and © Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof, SMB, Berlin; photograph: Jan Windszus

How the artists GCC, Lawrence Lek, The Propeller Group, Larissa Sansour and Christopher Kulendran Thomas are visualizing a world in which borders n