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frieze magazine

Issue 195

May 2018

The May issue of frieze features a visual essay by Heji Shin; a series of open letters to Adrian Piper; an interview with Maria Hassabi; David Salle's fan letter in praise of George W.S. Trow’s prescient commentary on American culture; and monographs on Ruth Asawa, Than Hussein Clark and Madeline Gins.

At Centro de Arte Dos de Mayo, Móstoles, a crepuscular glow lends acute poignancy to simple forms and materials   

By Max Andrews

A Hollywood actor whose image has become troll-bait is the protagonist of a show exploring cross-cultural identity and misogyny in the internet age

By Mimi Chu

At Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York, the artist transposes visions of queer intimacy into an animated technofuture

By Dana Kopel

All three galleries of Sprüth Magers’s Berlin space are given over to the late artist’s painterly evolution, much of which is long unseen

By John Quin

At Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, Paris, the artist's dialogue with an 11-year-old forms the basis for a work exploring exile and migration

By Violaine Boutet de Monvel

A touching show by the late American artist Bruce Conner in an unfinished church is a highlight of the city's burgeoning art scene

 

By Cristina Sanchez-Kozyreva

At Jan Mot, Brussels, nine letters written by the artist track the chilling resurgence of Nazism across the globe in recent years

By Ellen Mara De Wachter

From a drone strike in Pakistan to reconstructing Syrian torture cells, a survey of the Eyal Weizman-led 'counter-forensics' agency at London's ICA

By En Liang Khong

Two films show ways of approaching and exorcizing the country's troubled past at Emalin, London, UK

By Anya Harrison

At 303 Gallery, New York, the artist demonstrates how easily we give meaning to the mundane, and how easily we can give it away

By Aaron Bogart

Ahead of the opening of her Tate Britain Duveen Galleries commission The Squash, the Turner Prize nominee answers our Questionnaire

By Anthea Hamilton

At Tallinn Art Hall, an international group show grapples with the problematics underlying the concept of national identity

By Harry Thorne