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frieze magazine

Issue 196

June - August 2018

‘The human race has always clung to notions of borders, be they mental or physical. In recent years, though, welcome cracks are appearing – and that, as the great Leonard Cohen once sang, is how the light gets in.’
– Jennifer Higgie

Marking 80 years since the invention of LSD and 200 years since Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, the new issue of frieze is themed around ‘Altered States’ – cultural eruption, artistic experimentation and transformation. Featured artists, writers and designers include Sonia Boyce, Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Lantian Xie, David Lynch, Misheck Masamvu, Nick Mauss and Linda Stark among many others.

At Shanghai's Power Station of Art, a retrospective of the artist's large-scale installation work asking: why are we here?

Comic book images of female vulnerability become symbols of liberated sexual energy at Anton Kern Gallery, New York

A diverse range of shows, exploring ideas ranging from authoritarianism and free speech to interiority and tenderness

The artist creates a dreamy, domestic space in which ideas of intimacy and concealment are explored at Oakville Galleries, Ontario

Retrospectives at Musée des Arts Decoratifs and Palais Galliera, Paris showcase the designer's unique ways of relating garment to body

At the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Lynne Cooke's debut exhibition turns the spotlight on so-called 'outsider' artists

At this year’s GI festival, directed by Richard Parry, a future-focused assemblage of what it means to be human

Inti Guerrero’s show taps relentlessly at the question: what is the human cost of industry?

At Haus der Kunst, Munich, artists including Ed Atkins and Otobong Nkanga explore compliance and resistance in an era of wild digitalization

The Argentinian artist's playful, wise and, at times, prophetic work on show at Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires

At Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach, cheap post-modern furniture becomes a symbol of failed social and economic integration

With neo-fascist populism on the rise, two shows in Milan and Florence offer a timely look at a turbulent period in Italian history