Advertisement

Briefing

Glenstone to become the largest private museum in the US; Cardi Gallery readies its London space after a two-year renovation

Architectural rendering for the expansion of Glenstone, Maryland. Courtesy: Thomas Phifer and Partners

Architectural rendering for the expansion of Glenstone, Maryland. Courtesy: Thomas Phifer and Partners

  • Glenstone, a private museum in rural Potomac, Maryland, will become the largest of its kind in the US when it reopens in 2018. The ongoing expansion project, which is being led by architect Thomas Phifer, will create nearly 60,000 square-feet of exhibition space, more than the Broad in Los Angeles, the Rubell Family Collection in Miami, and the Whitney in New York.
     
  • The Milan-based Cardi Gallery will open its London outpost this coming Friday, having spent two years renovating the space. Located at 22 Grafton Street in Mayfair, the gallery will spread across six floors, and will boast more than 10,000 square feet of exhibition space. The inaugural show will take the title: ‘Arte Povera, American Minimalism, ZERO Group’. (Italian)
     
  • Artist Damon Davis is calling for a boycott of the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis due to the ‘racially and sexually charged’ nature of its current exhibition, ‘Direct Drive’, the first US solo exhibition of New York-based artist Kelley Walker. One of the contentious series comprises photographs of civil rights protests and police violence against black citizens, which Walker has smeared with whitening toothpaste and chocolate.
     
  • The Norwegian government is set to abandon plans to erect a memorial to the victims of the July 22 2011 bombing in Oslo and the accompanying Utøya shootings, which left 77 dead – 69 of which were children. The project, which was titled Memory Wound and was designed by Swedish artist Jonas Dahlberg, would have seen a wide alley cut through a section of coastline in the village of Sørbråten. However, local residents have fiercely opposed the memorial, calling the proposed design a ‘rape of nature’, a ‘tourist attraction’, and a ‘hideous monument’.
     
  • The Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York, has received a gift of USD$42.5 million – the largest in the gallery’s history – from art patron and investor Jeffrey Gundlach, the entirety of which will go towards the institution’s forthcoming expansion. The gallery’s new wing, which is being project managed by architect Shohei Shigematsu, will be named the Buffalo Albright-Knox-Gundlach Art Museum in honour of the donation.
     
  • Nicole Smythe-Johnson, a writer and curator based in Kingston, Jamaica, has been named as the curator for the inaugural Tilting Axis fellowship. Developed collaboratively by CCA Glasgow, David Dale Gallery, Hospitalfield, Mother Tongue and Tilting Axis, the fellowship involves a yearlong period of research split between the Caribbean region and Scotland, and aims to support the curatorial practices of Caribbean-based organizations.
     
  • The Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas has announced Pierre Huyghe as the winner of the the second Nasher Prize, in recognition of his outstanding contributions to sculpture. Okwui Enwezor, one of this year's jurors, said: 'Huyghe's work extends far beyond any tidy definition of sculpture in ways that continue to grow and develop well into his career, allowing for ever-new discoveries and artistic possibilities.' Huyghe will be officially presented with the award – which comes with USD$100,000 in prize money – in April of next year.
Advertisement

Latest Magazines

frieze magazine

November - December 2018

frieze magazine

January - February 2019

frieze magazine

March 2019