Jonathan Anderson: "Vivian Suter's works are like ever-changing still life paintings, capturing the beauty and vibrancy of nature."

The founder of British fashion label JW Anderson, and Creative Director of Loewe, shares his top collecting picks from Frieze Viewing Room.

Robert Gober, Tree Tree, 2019
Presented by Matthew Marks (main section)

Robert Gober, Tree tree, 2019. Graphite on paper. 5 x 4 inches. 13 x 10 cm. © Robert Gober, Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery

Robert Gober, Tree tree, 2019. Graphite on paper. 5 x 4 inches. 13 x 10 cm. © Robert Gober, Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery

This drawing by Robert Gober is so powerful, made even more so by its intimate scale and simplicity. Trees become penetrating bodies, an image that feels particularly poignant at a moment when we both desire and fear contact with others. The work is like a religious reliquary. It could fill a whole room.
 

Peter Collingwood, Untitled (black macrogauze) “M.89 No. 5” (1970-1971)
Presented by Richard Saltoun Gallery (main section)

Peter Collingwood, Untitled (Black Macrogauze)''M.89 No. 5'', c.1970 Black linen and stainless steel1. 14 x 41cm. Courtesy of Richard Salotoun Gallery

Peter Collingwood, Untitled (Black Macrogauze)''M.89 No. 5'', c.1970 Black linen and stainless steel1. 14 x 41cm. Courtesy of Richard Salotoun Gallery

Peter Collingwood is one of the most important yet underestimated artists working with textiles. He revolutionised weaving techniques, and disregarded the idea that textiles are merely a craft. His ‘macrogauzes’ are beautiful drawings in space. His two-person show with Hans Coper in 1969 at the V&A is one of those historical shows I wish I could have seen.

Fausto Melotti, Copetta, 1965
Presented by Barbara Mathes Gallery (main section)

FAUSTO MELOTTI, COPPETTA, 1965. 2.52'' X 5.51'' (6.4 CM X 14 CM). GLAZED POLYCHROME CERAMIC. Courtesy of Barbara Mathes Gallery

FAUSTO MELOTTI, COPPETTA, 1965. 2.52'' X 5.51'' (6.4 CM X 14 CM). GLAZED POLYCHROME CERAMIC. Courtesy of Barbara Mathes Gallery

 

I love Fausto Melotti’s delicate metal sculptures but these ceramic bowls are a discovery for me. His intricate brass sculptures come to life when they move and flex; these simple bowls have a similar quality, made from thinly-rolled clay which he uses to create undulating shapes and delicate iridescent glazes that highlight a sense of movement.

 

Vivian Suter, Untitled
Presented by Proyectos Ultravioleta (Focus section)

Vivian Suter, Untitled, n.d.234 x 178 cm. mixed media on fabric. Photo: Margo Porres. Courtesy of the Artist and Proyectos Ultravioleta, Guatemala City

Vivian Suter, Untitled, n.d.234 x 178 cm. mixed media on fabric. Photo: Margo Porres. Courtesy of the Artist and Proyectos Ultravioleta, Guatemala City

I always enjoy spending time in shows by Vivian Suter - they create that feeling of being completely immersed in, and embraced by, a work of art. As someone who works with textiles myself, I love the way in which she harnesses a sense of freedom with the canvas, how it changes each time it is shown, completely in dialogue with the architecture around it. These works are like ever-changing still life paintings, capturing the beauty and vibrancy of nature.

Liz Magor, Mini Polo (2019)
Presented by Andrew Kreps Gallery (main section)

Liz Magor, Mini Polo (2019). 88.9 x 20.3 cm. Silicone rubber, textiles, twine. Courtesy of Andrew Kreps Gallery

Liz Magor, Mini Polo (2019). 88.9 x 20.3 cm. Silicone rubber, textiles, twine. Courtesy of Andrew Kreps Gallery

I’ve been collecting Liz Magor’s work over the last couple of years. She always makes me look at objects in new ways - they often make me laugh out loud. This sculpture is completely absurd, but like all her work it poses questions without necessarily needing an answer. I can spend hours looking at them, every detail of which has been obsessively made.

Frieze Viewing Room is open May 8-15, with a Preview May 6-7. Registration is now open.