Questionnaire: Katy Moran

‘I had an amusing thought about being a tattoo artist the other day’

The Fall, 1977. Courtesy: Getty Images; photograph: Kevin Cummins

The Fall, 1977. Courtesy: Getty Images; photograph: Kevin Cummins

What images keep you company in the space where you work?
Images of my recent paintings currently on exhibition at Sperone Westwater, current inspirations and photos of my children.

What was the first piece of art that really mattered to you?
I grew up with David Hockney prints on the walls and his books on the shelves. As a fellow northerner, he made the idea that you could earn a living as an artist, tangible.

If you could live with only one piece of art what would it be?
Excavation (1950) by Willem de Kooning.

What is your favorite title of an artwork?
It’s strange but I don’t have one.

What do you wish you knew?
I wish I knew the experience of sitting round a big table with all my family, the ones who never met such as my grandparents and my children as my grandparents passed away before they were born.

What should change?
My paintings.

What should stay the same?
My paintings.

(Answers to questions 6 and 7 refer to British DJ John Peel who was quoted as saying that the band The Fall were ‘always different, always the same.’ This resonates with me in relation to the trajectory of my paintings.)

What could you imagine doing if you didn’t do what you do?
I had an amusing thought about being a tattoo artist the other day.

What music are you listening to?
When I’m painting, I listen to the same Mozart record over and over again on my record player.

What are you reading?
Deep Work by Cal Newport.

What do you like the look of?
The Dorothea Tanning Show at Tate Modern.

What is art for?
Communicating ways of feeling and experiencing this world which are non-verbal.

Katy Moran is an artist who lives and works in Hertfordshire, UK. Her first solo presentation at Sperone Westwater, ‘I want to live in the afternoon of that day’, is on view until 20 April 2019.

Latest Magazines

Janiva Ellis, Catchphrase Coping Mechanism, 2019, oil on linen, 2.2 x 1.8 m. Courtesy: the artist and 47 Canal, New York; photograph: Joerg Lohse

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May 2019

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