Lynne Tillman

Our lives – like menus – are an assortment of so-called ‘choices’

By Lynne Tillman

‘Movies don’t change, and I do, and I don’t. Memory isn’t a choice and, like everyone, I forget way more than I can recall, necessarily.’

By Lynne Tillman
Stan Brakhage filming The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes, 1971. Courtesy: © 2019 Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; photograph: Michael Chikiris

Lynne Tillman on the clash between real-life and expectation

By Lynne Tillman

‘The Western that heroized pioneers unsettling the West was moribund. Unforgiven, an anti-Western Western, buried it.’

By Lynne Tillman

What does a picture tell? Not one story 

By Lynne Tillman

From Kader Attia's couscous sculptures and Isa Genzken's 'towers', to Rorschach tests and Tony Kushner's Angels in America

By Lynne Tillman

A rare, newly-published interview with the late October editor, reveals an art critic intent on changing the terms of the debate

By Aaron Peck

Lynne Tillman on Paul Thomas Anderson's Phantom Thread, a tightly wrought film about a tightly controlled man

By Lynne Tillman

Growing old and growing value 

By Lynne Tillman

Dave Chappelle's comedy of discomfort 

By Lynne Tillman
Wallace Shawn, Evening at the Talk House, 2017. Courtesy: The New Group; photograph: Monique Carboni

A new play by Wallace Shawn examines what it means to survive in today’s society

By Lynne Tillman

How remembering the AIDS epidemic helps endure the crises of today

By Lynne Tillman