Briefing

Musician Pauline Oliveros passes away; Heather Phillipson wins the Jarman award; MCA Chicago announces renovation plans

pauline_oliveros_photograph_peter_kiers

Pauline Oliveros; photograph: Peter Kiers

Pauline Oliveros; photograph: Peter Kiers

  • The pioneering composer and performer Pauline Oliveros has passed away at the age of 84. Oliveros was the founder of the Deep Listening Institute, a professor of music at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, and co-founder of the San Francisco Tape Music Center, which was central to much of the musical experimentalism that took place on the west coast of America in the 1960s. Oliveros, who throughout her 20s moved an esteemed group that also featured the likes of Terry Riley, Steve Reich and Loren Rush, established the process of ‘deep listening’, a technique of sensing subtle sounds and vibrations that she deployed in order to ‘to listen to everything all the time, and to remind myself when I wasn’t listening.’
     
  • Heather Phillipson has won the GBP£10,000 2016 Film London Jarman Award from a shortlist featuring Sophia Al Maria, Cécile B. Evans, Shona Illingworth, Mikhail Karikis and Rachel Maclean. All six artists will receive a film commission for Channel 4’s short-form arts strand Random Acts. Editor Lucy Harris received the Jules Wright Prize of GBP£5,000 for Female Creative Technician. In its ninth year, the Film London Jarman Award is an annual prize for UK-based artist filmmakers, in association with Channel 4 and the Whitechapel Gallery, London.
     
  • The MCA Chicago has announced plans for a USD$16m renovation project, led by the Los Angeles architects Johnston Marklee, that will see 12,000-square-feet of its pre-existing exhibition space converted into gathering spaces, which will be free to the public. In a statement, Madeleine Grynsztejn, the museum’s director, said: ‘bigger is not always better’, adding that the redesign was an attempt to ‘[find] new ways to bring art, learning and food together, reflecting how people like to experience culture today.’
     
  • The Pinchuk Art Centre in Kiev has released the shortlist for the 4th edition of the Future Generation Art Prize. The list, which was cut from 4,421 entries to 21 by a selection committee of international curators, includes the likes of Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Sol Calero, Andy Holden, Martine Syms and Kemang Wa Lehulere. An exhibition of the work of the shortlisted artists will open at the Pinchuk Art Centre on 25 February, with a winner being announced in March.
     
  • The Institute of Contemporary Art Miami will open its new 37,500-square-foot space in Miami’s Design District in December of next year. The institution will inaugurate the new 37,500-square-foot space, which has been designed by Madrid-based firm Aranguren + Gallegos Arquitectos, with ‘The Everywhere Studio’, a group show featuring the likes of Bruce Nauman, Laure Prouvost, Carolee Schneemann and Andrea Zittel, amongst others.
     
  • Toronto’s Aga Khan Museum, a space dedicated to Islamic art, Iranian art and Muslim culture, is offering all newly arrived Syrian refugees free admission to its current exhibition, ‘Syria: A Living History’. Henry Kim, the director and CEO of the museum, said: ‘We want to welcome all Syrian newcomers to this country, and to ensure that they and their host families have the opportunity to join in our celebration of the diversity and history of Syria. […] We want Syrians to realize the value we place in their arrival in this country, and to understand that they are a vital part of the cultural mosaic of Canada.’
     
  • The Rubell Family Collection (RFC) has announced it will move to a new 100,000-square-foot space in Miami’s Allapattah District. Located on a 2.5-acre campus, the new museum is designed by Selldorf Architects and is slated to open in December 2018. The new space will include 40 exhibition galleries, a research library, lecture hall, event space, visible storage facility, sculpture garden and restaurant. The planned move comes after 23 years in the RFC’s current 40,000-square-foot space in Miami’s Wynwood District. 

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