2016 Highlights: Bert Rebhandl

The Revenant to Toni Erdmann to Elle: a look back at the year's best films

A press screening of The Revenant on 4 January proved a fine start to the film calendar of 2016. The way Mexican director Alejandro González Iñárritu dealt with tropes of the Western genre (blowing them up way too big for human stories to cope) also figured as a good lead for one of the leitmotifs of the year: the most interesting films were crossovers. The Revenant was an attempt to let the Western (a genre traditionally telling stories about the domestication wilderness of all kinds) be larger than life again – the beginnings of culture establishing itself in the New World, as told to an IMAX audience. González Iñárritu has made his way from highbrow arthouse movies, like his 2006 Babel, into the Hollywood system at a moment when Hollywood has finally stopped being anything like a place, instead merely a denominator for labyrinthe international investment.

The Coen Brothers, famously independent throughout most of their career, made one the best (and funniest) movies of the year, Hail, Caesar!, about the other, older Hollywood: the one we used to associate with a star review system, with movie moguls, with fabricated glamour and gossip. The work of a ‘fixer’, who cleans up after scandals, gives them a brillant opportunity to look into the mechanics of that ‘golden era’ of the studio system. It is also a farewell from afar, a take on an industry from the point of view of auteurs, by means of gently ridiculing those greatest stories ever told – Hollywood motion pictures.

Hail, Caesar!, 2016, dir. The Coen Brothers. Courtesy: Universal Pictures

Hail, Caesar!, 2016, dir. The Coen Brothers. Courtesy: Universal Pictures

Hail, Caesar!, 2016, dir. The Coen Brothers. Courtesy: Universal Pictures

World cinema has always oscillated between radical individualism and a perpetual longing for structure. Rare are the examples, when artists like Rainer Werner Fassbinder in Germany or Pedro Almodóvar in Spain, have been able to transcend their own careers and establish something like a mode of production that might potentially be viable for mainstream audiences. The career of Dutch director Paul Verhoeven fits a similar mould, having started out in the liberal Netherlands in the early 1970s, and then going on to make a few of the most titillating Hollywood movies of all time (Basic Instinct [1992], Showgirls [1995], Starship Troopers [1997]). Now back in Europe, his commercial instincts still intact, it seems he’s prepared to test the limits of any system.

Elle (due to be released in March 2017 in the UK) is a slap in the face of cultivated arthouse audiences; it is the marvellous Isabelle Huppert in the film who bears a similar violence. Huppert (Elle) is something akin to an advanced ideal of a contemporary woman: she runs a computer game start-up, leads a picture-book bourgeois lifestyle, and deals with the consequences of sexual assault with a shocking, almost perverse, calmness. With the unofficial trilogy of the recent Valley of Love, Mia Hansen-Løve’s L’avenir (Things to Come – a great film in itself) and Elle, Isabelle Huppert has emerged as quite simply the greatest actress on the planet. Feminists of all sexes will need years to come to terms with her nonchalance, her unwillingness to be victimized, her rationality in the face of evil and petty treason.

Elle, 2016, dir. Paul Verhoeven. Courtesy: Sony Pictures Classics

Elle, 2016, dir. Paul Verhoeven. Courtesy: Sony Pictures Classics

Elle, 2016, dir. Paul Verhoeven. Courtesy: Sony Pictures Classics

The screen persona that Huppert has come to distribute so consistently through her characters, from the early Coup de Torchon (1981) to the radical vision of Elle, may have been of interest to German actress Sandra Hüller, who stars in another film of the year, Maren Ade’s Toni Erdmann. The film tells the story of a female consultant working in Bucharest, trying to orchestrate a career (laying off Romanian workers) while being haunted by her estranged clownish father, who pops up at the most impossible moments. The wild two-and-a-half hour journey of Toni Erdmann is also a crossover: a fairly orthodox auteur movie bookending an almost classical comedy (or farce). One important aspect to the success of Toni Erdmann is a result of how it was made: the fulfillment of every auteur’s dream to be their own producer. Produced by Komplizen Film, the Berlin-based company is quietly becoming a small powerhouse of European cinema, with connections stretching in all directions (Miguel Gomes in Portugal, Radu Jude in Romania). It will always be too small to create its own distinct movement, and deliberately so. But Ade has shown to have an understanding, however implict, of what may be a possible type of movies of the future: half arthouse, half industry, half exploration, half entertainment, half field-trip, half karaoke. Many unequal halves made for audacious crossovers this year.

Lead image: The Revenant, 2016, dir. Alejandro González Iñárritu. Courtesy: 20th Century Fox

Bert Rebhandl is a journalist, writer and translator who lives in Berlin. He co-founded and co-edits Cargo magazine.

Most Read

With the 12th edition of the itinerant European biennial opening in Palermo, what do local artists, curators and...
In the age of Brexit, why Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s pledge to return the ‘stolen’ Parthenon marbles has never been...
The museum director, who resigned last year, acted with ‘integrity’, an independent report finds
In further news: study finds US film critics overwhelmingly white and male; woman sues father over Basquiat
With the government’s push for the controversial English baccalaureate, why the arts should be an integral part of the...
From Bruce Nauman at the Schaulager to the story of a 1970s artist community in Carona at Weiss Falk, all the shows to...
Sotheby’s and Christie’s say they are dropping the practice of using female-only staff to pose for promotional...
For the annual city-wide art weekender ahead of Basel, the best shows and events to attend around town
For our second report from BB10, ahead of its public opening tomorrow, a focus on KW Institute for Contemporary Art
The curators seem set to ask, ‘how civilized is the world’s current state of affairs?’
In further news: declining UK museum visitors sees country fall in world rankings; first winner of Turner Prize,...
The Icelandic-Danish artist’s creation in Vejle, Denmark, responds to the tides and surface of the water: both artwork...
In further news: Emperor Constantine’s missing finger discovered in the Louvre; and are Van Gogh’s Sunflowers turning...
The opening of a major new exhibition by Lee Bul was delayed after one of the South Korean artist’s works caught fire
The LA-based painter’s exquisite skewing of Renaissance and biblical scenes at Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London
Lee Bul, Abortion, 1989, performance documentation. Courtesy: the artist and PKM Gallery, Seoul
In a climate of perma-outrage has live art self-censored to live entertainment?

A tribute to the iconic New York journal: a platform through which founder Andy Warhol operated as artist, hustler and...
A distinctively American artist who, along with four neighbourhood contemporaries, changed the course of US painting...
From Assemble’s marbled floor tiles to Peter Zumthor's mixed-media miniatures, Emily King reports from the main...
From Ian White's posthumous retrospective to Lloyd Corporation's film about a cryptocurrency pyramid scheme, what to...
Kimberly Bradley speaks to ‘the German’ curator on the reasons for his early exit from the Austrian institution
In further news: #MeToo flashmob at Venice Architecture Biennale; BBC historian advocates for return of British...
German museums are being pushed to diversify their canons and respond to a globalized world – but is ‘cleaning up’ the...
Sophie Fiennes’s new film Bloodlight and Bami reveals a personal side of the singer as yet unseen 
‘At last there is a communal mechanism for women to call a halt to the demeaning conventions of machismo’
The German artist has put up 18 works for sale to raise money to buy 100 homes
The novelist explored Jewish identity in the US through a lens of frustrated heterosexuality
Artist Jesse Jones, who represented Ireland at last year’s Venice Biennale, on what is at stake in Friday’s Irish...
‘I spend more time being seduced by the void … as a way of energizing my language’: poet Wayne Koestenbaum speaks about...
To experience the music of the composer, who passed away last week at the age of 69, was to hear something tense,...
In a year charged with politicized tensions, mastery of craft trumps truth-to-power commentary
In further news: women wearing rainbow badges beaten in Beijing’s 798; gallerists Georg Kargl and Richard Gray have...
‘Coping as a woman in France is a daily battle: the aggression can be subtle, and you always have to push harder to...
Toyin Ojih Odutola’s portraits of a fictional aristocratic Nigerian family push toward an expanded definition...

On View

Latest Magazines

frieze magazine

April 2018

frieze magazine

May 2018

frieze magazine

June - August 2018