Briefing

Istanbul Biennial announces artists; Abounaddara say Milan Triennale showed work without consent; Beirut Arab Art Museum to open in 2020

Abounaddara, The Lady of Syria: Part 2, 2013, video still

Abounaddara, The Lady of Syria: Part 2, 2013, video still. Courtesy: the artists

Abounaddara, The Lady of Syria: Part 2, 2013, video still. Courtesy: the artists

The Istanbul Biennial has announced the list of artists for its 15th edition, titled ‘a good neighbour’. The line-up features 55 artists from 32 countries including Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Monica Bonvicini, Kaari Upson, Kemang Wa Lehulere and Bilal Yılmaz. The biennial, organized by the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts, runs from 16 September to 12 November 2017 and is curated by Berlin-based artist duo Elmgreen & Dragset: ‘The artists in the 15th Istanbul Biennial raise questions about ideas of home, neighbourhood, belonging and co-existence from multiple perspectives’, they said in a statement. You can see the full artist list here.

Cady Noland is suing three galleries over copyright infringement concerning her Log Cabin (1990) sculpture. Noland claims that copyright was infringed when a conservator was employed to carry out repairs on the sculpture without consultation – by replacing rotting components with new wood, the conservator in effect carried out a reproduction, Noland asserts. The suit names collector Wilhelm Schurmann, KOW Gallery of Berlin, dealer Chris D’Amelio, Galerie Michael Janssen (as well as Janssen himself). Noland has invoked the Visual Artist Rights Act which grants permission to visual artists to disown their work in particular contexts, including restorations due to ‘gross negligence’.

Syrian film collective Abounaddara have accused the curators of the current Milan Triennale for showing its films without consent. Abounaddara say they were approached late last year for inclusion in the triennale’s exhibition ‘La Terra Inquieta (The Restless Earth)’ but despite declining, their films made their way into the show. The triennale organizers say that the films are being streamed via Abounaddara’s Vimeo account and are therefore ‘available’ on the internet. The collective have warned that they will remove the online films in protest: ‘the Triennale of Milan is making use of films that deal with the Syrian struggle for dignity, to serve an aesthetic-political discourse on the “refugee crisis” from a Western point of view’, they said in a statement. You can read Christy Lange in frieze issue 178, April 2016, on how Abounaddara have deployed a strategy of ‘emergency cinema’ in which they have chosen to ‘invent new rules of representation’ and call for ‘the right to a dignified image’.

The British Art Market Federation have released a report on the health of the UK art market, finding it heavily reliant on trade with the EU. The report, prepared by Clare McAndrew’s Arts Economics, confirms the UK as hosting the second largest art market in the world, with an overall contribution to the British economy estimated at GBP£1.46 billion in 2016. Fifteen to 20% of purchases through British dealers and auctioneers go to EU buyers. Anthony Browne, chair of BAMF, said that the data ‘reinforces that the art market is something the government should care about’. 

The privately funded Beirut Arab Art Museum is set to open in 2020, becoming the Lebanese capital’s biggest art museum. The 10,000-15,000 square metre museum will house the collection of the Ramzi and Saeda Dalloul Art Foundation – one of the largest holdings of modern and contemporary art from the Middle East. It will join an expanding arts scene, with the Renzo Piano-designed Beirut City Museum already under construction. ‘We’d like to show a better face of this part of the planet’, Basel Dalloul, the director of the family art collection said. You can read our recent Postcard from Beirut by David Markus on how local artists are learning to grapple with a perpetually shifting socio-political landscape.

Last Wednesday, London’s PEER art space in East London named a community garden outside the gallery as Khadija’s Garden, in tribute to the artist Khadija Saye who was a victim of the Grenfell Tower fire on 14 June 2017. Saye fundraised for and planted the garden as part of the gallery’s refurbishment last year. Friends and mentors of Saye pay tribute to her extraordinary talent on the frieze website today.

Most Read

With the 12th edition of the itinerant European biennial opening in Palermo, what do local artists, curators and...
In the age of Brexit, why Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s pledge to return the ‘stolen’ Parthenon marbles has never been...
The museum director, who resigned last year, acted with ‘integrity’, an independent report finds
In further news: study finds US film critics overwhelmingly white and male; woman sues father over Basquiat
With the government’s push for the controversial English baccalaureate, why the arts should be an integral part of the...
From Bruce Nauman at the Schaulager to the story of a 1970s artist community in Carona at Weiss Falk, all the shows to...
Sotheby’s and Christie’s say they are dropping the practice of using female-only staff to pose for promotional...
For the annual city-wide art weekender ahead of Basel, the best shows and events to attend around town
For our second report from BB10, ahead of its public opening tomorrow, a focus on KW Institute for Contemporary Art
The curators seem set to ask, ‘how civilized is the world’s current state of affairs?’
In further news: declining UK museum visitors sees country fall in world rankings; first winner of Turner Prize,...
The Icelandic-Danish artist’s creation in Vejle, Denmark, responds to the tides and surface of the water: both artwork...
In further news: Emperor Constantine’s missing finger discovered in the Louvre; and are Van Gogh’s Sunflowers turning...
The opening of a major new exhibition by Lee Bul was delayed after one of the South Korean artist’s works caught fire
The LA-based painter’s exquisite skewing of Renaissance and biblical scenes at Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London
Lee Bul, Abortion, 1989, performance documentation. Courtesy: the artist and PKM Gallery, Seoul
In a climate of perma-outrage has live art self-censored to live entertainment?

A tribute to the iconic New York journal: a platform through which founder Andy Warhol operated as artist, hustler and...
A distinctively American artist who, along with four neighbourhood contemporaries, changed the course of US painting...
From Assemble’s marbled floor tiles to Peter Zumthor's mixed-media miniatures, Emily King reports from the main...
From Ian White's posthumous retrospective to Lloyd Corporation's film about a cryptocurrency pyramid scheme, what to...
Kimberly Bradley speaks to ‘the German’ curator on the reasons for his early exit from the Austrian institution
In further news: #MeToo flashmob at Venice Architecture Biennale; BBC historian advocates for return of British...
German museums are being pushed to diversify their canons and respond to a globalized world – but is ‘cleaning up’ the...
Sophie Fiennes’s new film Bloodlight and Bami reveals a personal side of the singer as yet unseen 
‘At last there is a communal mechanism for women to call a halt to the demeaning conventions of machismo’
The German artist has put up 18 works for sale to raise money to buy 100 homes
The novelist explored Jewish identity in the US through a lens of frustrated heterosexuality
Artist Jesse Jones, who represented Ireland at last year’s Venice Biennale, on what is at stake in Friday’s Irish...
‘I spend more time being seduced by the void … as a way of energizing my language’: poet Wayne Koestenbaum speaks about...
To experience the music of the composer, who passed away last week at the age of 69, was to hear something tense,...
In a year charged with politicized tensions, mastery of craft trumps truth-to-power commentary
In further news: women wearing rainbow badges beaten in Beijing’s 798; gallerists Georg Kargl and Richard Gray have...
‘Coping as a woman in France is a daily battle: the aggression can be subtle, and you always have to push harder to...
Toyin Ojih Odutola’s portraits of a fictional aristocratic Nigerian family push toward an expanded definition...

On View

Latest Magazines

frieze magazine

April 2018

frieze magazine

May 2018

frieze magazine

June - August 2018