Returning to the Crime Scene: How Forensic Architecture Unpicks State Impunity

From a drone strike in Pakistan to reconstructing Syrian torture cells, a survey of the Eyal Weizman-led 'counter-forensics' agency at London's ICA

That technology lives a double life is hardly news. A decade ago, Twitter, still in its optimistic infancy, was used to galvanize opposition protests in Iran; today, it's attempting to clean out Russian-linked troll accounts. But Forensic Architecture – a research group based at Goldsmiths, University of London – reminds us that surveillance tools and resources in the age of big data can, with effort, also be turned back against unaccountable states.

Consider how the gaze is inverted in Drone Strike in Miranshah (2013–16), which solders together smuggled phone footage showing the aftermath of a 2012 US drone strike in North Waziristan, Pakistan. We wonder why certain parts of a building's internal wall, the scene of the blast, are missing tell-tale shrapnel markings. Think of the wall as a piece of photographic film, the voiceover tells us, and look again. When the revelation falls into place, it's horrifying: just as the negative is exposed to light, human bodies have absorbed the impact of the explosion, and left haunting outlines behind.

body-1-miranshah.jpg

Multiple still video frames stitched together by Forensic Architecture to recreate the scene of the destroyed room, 2012. Image courtesy: Forensic Architecture and the Rachel Maddow Show, MSNBC

Forensic Architecture, Drone Strike in Miranshah, 2013–16, multiple still video frames stitched together to recreate the scene of the destroyed room, 2012. Courtesy: Forensic Architecture and the Rachel Maddow Show, MSNBC

Forensic Architecture was founded in 2010 by architect Eyal Weizman, whose early work charted how the landscape of the Occupied Territories – from 'apartheid roads' to hilltop settlements – had been weaponized. Weizman was deeply influenced by Edward Said's demand for a counter-cartography of the Israel-Palestine conflict. And if Said demonstrated how maps were 'instruments of conquest', architecture, too, Weizman argued, had always been an explicitly political enterprise. Now Forensic Architecture's multidisciplinary researchers present their first UK survey, 'Counter Investigations' at London's ICA, which remaps state impunity. Recent investigations, many of which have been used as legal evidence, are here realized as films and weekly workshops.

If architecture too often impresses its materiality upon us, then it's the emotional properties of sound that are foregrounded in Torture in Saydnaya Prison (2015–16), shown as a documentary reconstruction of Bashar al-Assad's notorious Syrian torture cells. With journalists denied access, Forensic Architecture's investigation relied on survivors's testimony. Prisoners were kept for years in total darkness, and their painful stories are recounted in sonic terms – the drip-dripping of a tap, the crack of electric cables, and the screams of new arrivals. These traumatic memories are combined with echo profiling, as a digital model of the prison unfolds on screen.

body-3ground-truth_3.jpg

Ariel Caine, Hagit Keysar and the children of Araqib fly kites mounted with cameras on the edge of the al-Turi Cemetery, 2016. Image courtesy: Ariel Caine and Forensic Architecture

Forensic Architecture, Destruction and Return in the al-Araqib Negev/Naqab Desert, Israel/Palestine, 2010–ongoing, photograph of Ariel Caine, Hagit Keysar and the children of Araqib flying kites mounted with cameras on the edge of the al-Turi Cemetery, Israel/Palestine, 2016. Courtesy: Ariel Caine and Forensic Architecture

The Murder of Halit Yozgat (2016–ongoing) is narrated through a video triptych, which revisits the 2006 shooting of a Turkish-German man in an internet cafe in Kassel, Germany – part of a wave of neo-Nazi attacks across the country. What made the killing exceptional was that a state intelligence agent, Andreas Temme, was in the cafe at the time; Temme later claimed not to have heard or smelled gunshot, or noticed the dead body before exiting the building. Forensic Architecture's film follows their building a 1:1 replica of the cafe from leaked police reconstructions, using it to track the sound of gunfire, smell of gunshot and Temme's line of sight, with damning conclusions. Temme was originally cleared as a suspect, but after Forensic Architecture's findings were shown at last year's documenta 14, the case has received renewed interest from authorities.

body-2-sea-watch_1.jpg

An image projected onto a 3D model in order reconstruct the complicated scene of search-and-rescue operations by the Libyan Coastguard and NGO vessels on 6 November 2017. Image courtesy: Forensic Oceanography and Forensic Architecture

Forensic Oceanography, The Left-to-Die Boat, Central Mediterranean Sea, 27 March 2011, 2017, image projected onto a 3D model in order reconstruct the search-and-rescue operations by the Libyan Coastguard and NGO vessels on 6 November 2017. Courtesy: Forensic Oceanography and Forensic Architecture

Jean Baudrillard famously articulated his anxieties over hyper-mediated living in his expression 'the map precedes the territory', acknowledging how our representations of space might become more 'real' to us than lived reality. His cynicism misses how maps can be redrawn and contested, revealing new territories. In an animation calling on thermal imagery, distress signals and mobile data, The Left-to-Die Boat (2012) by Forensic Architecture's offshoot project, Forensic Oceanography, traces the deadly course of refugees in the Mediterranean, set adrift off the coast of Libya in 2011; their boat is met by a succession of vessels that never stop to help. It's a tragic testament to the map's power – only when the waters are reconstituted as a mass of electromagnetic waves can we glimpse the real murder weapon: an abdication of responsibility.

Forensic Architecture, ‘Counter Investigations’ runs at the ICA, London, until 6 May.

Main image: Forensic Architecture, The Murder of Halit Yozgat, Kassel, Germany, 6 April 2006, 2016–ongoing, a composite of physical and virtual reconstructions of the internet cafe in which the murder of Halit Yozgat on 6 April 2006 occurred. Courtesy: Forensic Architecture

En Liang Khong is assistant digital editor at frieze. His writing on politics and art has been published in Prospect, Financial Times, Times Literary Supplement, Los Angeles Review of Books, The New Statesman, The Daily Telegraph and The New Inquiry. Follow him on Twitter: @en_khong

Issue 195

First published in Issue 195

May 2018

Most Read

The punk artists’s invasion of the pitch during the Croatia vs. France match reminded us what Russia’s new ‘normality’...
In further news: Brexit voters avoid arts; New York libraries’s culture pass unlocks museums; Grayson Perry-backed...
If artificial intelligence were ever to achieve sentience, could it feasibly produce art? (And would it be good?)
The punk activist-artists have been charged with disruption after they charged the field during the France vs Croatia...
27 educators are taking the London gallery to an employment tribunal, demanding that they be recognized as employees
In further news: Glasgow School of Art to be rebuilt; Philadelphia Museum of Art gets a Frank Gehry-designed restaurant
Highlights from Condo New York 2018 and Commonwealth and Council at 47 Canal: the summer shows to see
Knussen’s music laid out each component as ‘precarious, vulnerable, exposed’ – and his conducting similarly worked from...
Nods to the game in World Cup celebrations show how dance has gone viral – but unwittingly instrumentalized for...
‘You can’t reason with him but you can ridicule him’ – lightweight as it is, Trump Baby is a win for art as a...
Anderson and partner Juman Malouf are sorting through the treasures of the celebrated Kunsthistorisches Museum for...
From Capote to Basquiat, the pop artist’s glittering ‘visual diary’ of the last years of his life is seen for the first...
‘When I opened Monika Sprüth Galerie, only very few German gallerists represented women artists’
Can a ragtag cluster of artists, curators and critics really push back against our ‘bare’ art world?
In further news: German government buys Giambologna at the eleventh hour; LACMA’s new expansion delayed
Gucci and Frieze present film number two in the Second Summer of Love series, focusing on the history of acid house
Judges described the gallery’s GBP£20 million redevelopment by Jamie Fobert Architects as ‘deeply intelligent’ and a ‘...
Is the lack of social mobility in the arts due to a self-congratulatory conviction that the sector represents the...
The controversial intellectual suggests art would be better done at home – she should be careful what she wishes for
Previously unheard music on Both Directions At Once includes blues as imposing as the saxophonist would ever record
In further news: Macron reconsiders artist residencies; British Council accused of censorship; V&A to host largest...
In our devotion to computation and its predictive capabilities are we rushing blindly towards our own demise?
Arts subjects are increasingly marginalized in the UK curriculum – but the controversial intellectual suggests art is...
An exhibition of performances at Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw, unfolds the rituals of sexual encounters
An art historian explains what the Carters’s takeover of the Paris museum says about art, race and power
Artist Andrea Fraser’s 2016 in Museums, Money and Politics lifts the lid on US museum board members and...
The Ruhrtriennale arts festival disinvited the Scottish hip-hop trio for their pro-Palestinian politics, then u-turned
The Baltimore’s director on why correcting the art historical canon is not only right but urgent for museums to remain...
Serpentine swimmers complain about Christo’s floating pyramid; and Hermitage’s psychic cat is a World Cup oracle: the...
The largest mural in Europe by the artist has been hidden for 30 years in an old storage depot – until now
Alumni Martin Boyce, Karla Black, Duncan Campbell and Ciara Phillips on the past and future of Charles Rennie...
In further news: po-mo architecture in the UK gets heritage status; Kassel to buy Olu Oguibe’s monument to refugees
The frieze columnist's first novel is an homage to, and embodiment of, the late, great Kathy Acker
60 years after the celebrated Brutalist architect fell foul of local authorities, a Berlin Unité d’Habitation apartment...
The British artist and Turner Prize winner is taking on the gun advocacy group at a time of renewed debate around arms...
The central thrust of the exhibition positions Sicily as the fulcrum of geopolitical conflicts over migration, trade,...
The Carters’s museum takeover powers through art history’s greatest hits – with a serious message about how the canon...
The 20-metre-high Mastaba finally realizes the artist and his late wife Jeanne-Claude’s design
‘What is being exhibited at Manifesta, above all, is Palermo itself’
With the 12th edition of the itinerant European biennial opening in Palermo, what do local artists, curators and...
In the age of Brexit, why Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s pledge to return the ‘stolen’ Parthenon marbles has never been...
The curators seem set to ask, ‘how civilized is the world’s current state of affairs?’
US true crime series Unsolved takes two formative pop cultural events to explore their concealed human stories and...

On View

Latest Magazines

frieze magazine

April 2018

frieze magazine

May 2018

frieze magazine

June - August 2018