frieze magazine

Issue 204

June - July - August 2019

Three novelists delve into the past to unearth the present. Lucy Ives considers the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, ‘What you needed to survive in 1969 was, apparently, not the straight and narrow. What you needed was fiction. And guilt’; César Aira recalls his childhood in Coronel Pringles and his mother’s overbearing fixation on cultural refinement; and Heike Geißler pens a new work of autobiographical fiction that reflects on our exasperated age of news cycles, scandal and movement.

Plus, 32 reviews from around the world, including reports on two New York shows that chart Lincoln Kirstein’s legacy. In London, two exhibitions showcase Channa Horwitz and Emma Kunz’s play with reason and repetition, at the Lisson Gallery and Serpentine Galleries.

Cover image: Buzz Aldrin deploys Apollo 11 experiments on the surface of the moon (detail), 1969, photograph taken by Neil Armstrong with a 70mm lunar surface camera. Courtesy: NASA

With a recent show at Stephen Friedman Gallery, the Grenadian-born British artist talks to Osei Bonsu about painting, London's 1980s club scene and moving to Cornwall

By Osei Bonsu

Ian F. Martin traces the life and career of the pioneering Japanese musician, on the 50th anniversary of his first record

By Ian F. Martin

A survey show of the late artist’s restlessly inventive work at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris

By William Davie

At Lawrie Shabibi, Dubai, the UAE-born artist pays homage to his local terrains

By Evan Moffitt

A show at Hong Kong’s Tai Kwun Contemporary asks whether to be a woman is always to be damaged goods

By Jennifer Piejko

At Shanghai’s Qiao Space, the artist’s ambitious new project raises more questions than it answers

By Simon Frank

‘Movies don’t change, and I do, and I don’t. Memory isn’t a choice and, like everyone, I forget way more than I can recall, necessarily.’

By Lynne Tillman

The Italian artist, who currently has a solo show at MAXXI in Rome, discusses her influences, her frustrations and her love of mozzarella

By Paola Pivi

The artist walks a fine line between nostalgic irreverence and wry critique

By Fanny Singer

In her compellingly off-kilter sculpture, Reaves imagines strange and dire futures

By Chris Wiley

At Nasher Sculpture Center, the prolific artist’s solo exhibition chafes at the history of Western modernism

By Jonathan Griffin

At Display, Prague, the Brazilian artist questions the insidious mechanisms that govern women’s reproductive health

By Phoebe Blatton