Literature

In the Dream House grapples with the ‘bad PR’ of an abusive queer relationship

By Bryony White

Our lives – like menus – are an assortment of so-called ‘choices’

By Lynne Tillman

The newly reissued novel maps the intimate spatial connections between fascism and patriarchy in postwar Austria

By Matthew Turner

Three new novels – by Annie Ernaux, Vigdis Hjorth and Ocean Vuong – attempt to salvage something from painful intimate memories

By Eloise Hendy

In ‘Coventry’, events seem to happen to somebody else, to a person Cusk repeatedly exposes and judges

By Brian Dillon

Reckoning with the legacy of Jim Harrison, whose writing portrayed women like meals – meant to give pleasure and comfort, without having any hunger themselves

By Julia Langbein

Like Vivian Maier’s photography, Christina Hesselholdt’s novel embraces digression and relishes humanity in its multiplicity

By Mitch Speed

 ‘We have lost one of the best and greatest of us,’ Keene writes. ‘She helped us to see and become ourselves, to put pen to paper and language to our lives.’

By John Keene

Diana Hamilton reflects on the dual urges to be beautiful and well-reviewed – even when you want to reject both desires

By Diana Hamilton

Fifty years ago, when a lump of extra-terrestrial iron fireballed towards Belfast, a stampede of street kids stopped in their tracks

By Pádraig Ó Meiscill

In My Mother Laughs, Akerman’s pain while watching her mother’s health worsen becomes entwined with the shock of heartbreak

By Steven Zultanski

Her lyrical, haunting novel Celestial Bodies exposes the global forces that preclude literary value from flowing in both directions

By Sarah Jilani