What Time Is It on the Clock of the World

A report from the festival on feminism and public space in Hamburg

Hamburg’s Rathausmarkt is full of performers. It’s a public holiday in Germany and tourists are dotted about the square posing for photos, while a mime painted entirely blue stands stock still hoping to solicit their attention and money. The performance I’m here to see, however, is to the immediate left of the square, on a pedestrian street flanked on each side by shops. I arrive to find a small crowd surrounding the Guatemalan artist Regina José Galindo, who is buried up to her neck in a huge pile of rubble. Over the course of the next 45 minutes a group of women work to free the artist by forming a line and passing pieces of the debris from one person to the next, with the last person in the chain creating a new pile on the pavement.

José Galindo’s performance was commissioned as a part of What Time Is It on the Clock of the World* a festival on feminism and public space which consisted of performances, lectures, workshops and concerts spread over four days in early May. The festival is the last scheduled event by Hamburg’s Stadtkuratorin Sophie Goltz, who for the past three years has curated the public art in the city. Given that one of the successes of recent feminism online has been an increased recognition of the everyday sexism and violence that women encounter in public spaces, the attempt to bring the two concepts together is both relevant and timely.

regina_jose_galindo_aun_no_somos_escombros_wir_sind_noch_keine_trummer_2016_documentation_of_performance_at_what_time_is_it_on_the_clock_of_the_world_stadtkuratorin_hamburg._photograph_frank_egel

Regina José Galindo, Aún no somos escombros (Wir sind noch keine Trümmer), 2016, documentation of performance at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Frank Egel

Regina José Galindo, Aún no somos escombros (Wir sind noch keine Trümmer), 2016, documentation of performance at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Frank Egel

The second performer of the day, Hannah Black, chose not to appear in public at all: her performance was recorded in a nearby location and played via headphones distributed in the square. Opening with the statement ‘the gaze of others irritates the skin’, Black’s stream of consciousness text touched on many of the reoccurring themes of her writing, such as race ‘a movie about a white man with a name fighting Arab men with no names’; interiority ‘what ever is in your head is what is supposed to be in your head’ as well as self-worth and beauty ‘congratulations you’re beautiful now’.

In hindsight I can’t help but view her performance in connection to activist and writer Tyler Ford’s reading on the final day of the conference. As a person of colour who identifies as gender non-binary, for Ford any excursion in public is proceeded by a series of questions: ‘What do I need to wear to become invisible’, ‘Where can I use the bathroom’ and ‘Can my needs and goals be accomplished at home?’ If part of the thrill of live performance is not knowing how the public will react, whether they will accept or disrupt what plays out before them, Black’s refusal to be present was a reminder that people of colour, or those who identify as LGBTQ, don’t need to ‘stage a performance’ to recreate that situation – their bodies are subject to public consumption every time they step outside.

hannah_black_constant_2016_documentation_of_sound_installation_at_what_time_is_it_on_the_clock_of_the_world_stadtkuratorin_hamburg._photograph_frank_egel

Hannah Black, CONSTANT, 2016, documentation of sound installation at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Frank Egel

Hannah Black, CONSTANT, 2016, documentation of sound installation at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Frank Egel

Black’s performance was also live streamed on the Stadtkuratorin website which is fitting considering Black and Ford both rose to prominence through social media. It also acknowledges the importance of online communities for people like Ford who ‘carve out spaces for ourselves online when no space is granted to us in the physical world’.

From the beginning of the next day’s conference it became clear that the festival was indeed not ‘just’ about feminism. In Sophie Goltz opening speech she spoke of organizing What Time Is It on the Clock of the World* as a response to ‘these hysterical times’; referencing the growing neo-fascism in Europe, which is represented in Germany by the success of far-right political groups such as Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), whose leader Frauke Petry advocates shooting refugees at borders.

alice_peragine_soft_core._protection_procedure_2016_documentation_of_performance_at_what_time_is_it_on_the_clock_of_the_world_stadtkuratorin_hamburg._photograph_frank_egel

Alice Peragine, Soft Core. Protection Procedure, 2016, documentation of performance at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Frank Egel

Alice Peragine, Soft Core. Protection Procedure, 2016, documentation of performance at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Frank Egel

In the opening lecture Boaventura de Sousa Santos laid the groundwork for rest of the speakers by arguing that the three modes of domination: capitalism, colonialism and patriarchy work in concert and therefore have to be targeted simultaneously. For Sousa Santos, women, people of colour, migrants and asylum seekers are the object of discourses on human rights rather than the subjects of human rights themselves, and are, therefore, treated as ‘subhuman’.

The denial of the humanity of refugees and minorities was a common concern for many of the speakers: in Ovidiu Tichindeleanu’s lecture on the ‘new racism of Eastern Europe’, the philosopher and social theorist looked at the worrying trend of prominent intellectuals spouting anti-refugee rhetoric in the former Eastern Bloc; Nikos Papastergiadis touched upon the idea of the ‘deserving’ human/refugee in his talk on multiculturalism and Che Gossett argued the caging and mass killing of black people and animals can be seen as interlinked.

krishna_istha_manifestos_deg3_2016_documentation_of_performance_at_what_time_is_it_on_the_clock_of_the_world_stadtkuratorin_hamburg._photograph_anne_linke

Krishna Istha, 'Manifestos °3', 2016, documentation of performance at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Anne Linke

Krishna Istha, 'Manifestos °3', 2016, documentation of performance at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Anne Linke

The ‘Manifestos’ section of the conference, organized in collaboration with Berlin-based writer and blogger Hengameh Yaghoobifarah, brought together four prominent queer writers, performers and activists. These performative contributions, by Travis Alabanza, Tyler Ford, Krishna Istha and Womantis Random, were also gathered into a takeaway ‘zine and aimed to ‘draft a glossary on urban space from a queer-feminist perspective’.

This inclusion brought up the most interesting conversation of the weekend for me when, during a sparsely attended roundtable discussion, Travis Alabanza asked an open question about why there were not more non-binary people of colour present at the festival. Questions followed about whose responsibility it was to encourage attendance, which developed into a general discussion about how to reach people who did not have access to the internet, couldn’t afford travel, or may be simply put of by the formidable building of the Hochschule für bildende Künste (HfbK) where the talks took place.

mujeres_creando_andrea_callejas_herrera_la_paz_grafiteada_y_panfleteada_2016_documentation_of_performance_at_what_time_is_it_on_the_clock_of_the_world_stadtkuratorin_hamburg._photograph_frank_egel

Mujeres Creando (Andrea Callejas Herrera, La Paz), Grafiteada y Panfleteada, 2016, documentation of performance at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Frank Egel

Mujeres Creando (Andrea Callejas Herrera, La Paz), Grafiteada y Panfleteada, 2016, documentation of performance at What Time Is It on the Clock of the World*, Stadtkuratorin Hamburg. Photograph: Frank Egel

While I don’t want to speak for others, as a former HfbK student I was surprised why more of the student body were not present at events over the weekend. As previous HfbK talks by grumpy, old, white men Olaf Metzel and Dan Graham were packed out, I can only conclude that the students are simply apathetic about the issues of race, class and gender discussed during What Time Is It ... As one audience member put it, ‘Why would people already in a position of dominance want to learn from others?’

One group that were less than apathetic about the programme, however, was the AfD. During the festival Bürgerschaftskandidat, AfD member, Dr. Alexander Wolf, sent the Hamburg Senat a list of six thinly veiled racist questions about the funding and political inclinations of the participants (as he is a member of the Senat, they are required to answer). The subject of the email can be roughly translated as: ‘“Gender-Ga-Ga” at what cost to the taxpayer?’ His flippant tone not only makes light of the very real problems facing women, minorities and refugees but also brings up the nastiness of the not too distant past where when women were labelled hysterics and locked up for not conforming to prescribed gender roles. With one email Wolf proved the value and continuing necessity of events like this one in Hamburg – no matter whether 50 or 5,000 people show up.

Chloe Stead is a writer and critic based in Berlin.

Most Read

With the 12th edition of the itinerant European biennial opening in Palermo, what do local artists, curators and...
In the age of Brexit, why Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s pledge to return the ‘stolen’ Parthenon marbles has never been...
The museum director, who resigned last year, acted with ‘integrity’, an independent report finds
In further news: study finds US film critics overwhelmingly white and male; woman sues father over Basquiat
With the government’s push for the controversial English baccalaureate, why the arts should be an integral part of the...
From Bruce Nauman at the Schaulager to the story of a 1970s artist community in Carona at Weiss Falk, all the shows to...
Sotheby’s and Christie’s say they are dropping the practice of using female-only staff to pose for promotional...
For the annual city-wide art weekender ahead of Basel, the best shows and events to attend around town
For our second report from BB10, ahead of its public opening tomorrow, a focus on KW Institute for Contemporary Art
The curators seem set to ask, ‘how civilized is the world’s current state of affairs?’
In further news: declining UK museum visitors sees country fall in world rankings; first winner of Turner Prize,...
The Icelandic-Danish artist’s creation in Vejle, Denmark, responds to the tides and surface of the water: both artwork...
In further news: Emperor Constantine’s missing finger discovered in the Louvre; and are Van Gogh’s Sunflowers turning...
The opening of a major new exhibition by Lee Bul was delayed after one of the South Korean artist’s works caught fire
The LA-based painter’s exquisite skewing of Renaissance and biblical scenes at Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London
Lee Bul, Abortion, 1989, performance documentation. Courtesy: the artist and PKM Gallery, Seoul
In a climate of perma-outrage has live art self-censored to live entertainment?

A tribute to the iconic New York journal: a platform through which founder Andy Warhol operated as artist, hustler and...
A distinctively American artist who, along with four neighbourhood contemporaries, changed the course of US painting...
From Assemble’s marbled floor tiles to Peter Zumthor's mixed-media miniatures, Emily King reports from the main...
From Ian White's posthumous retrospective to Lloyd Corporation's film about a cryptocurrency pyramid scheme, what to...
Kimberly Bradley speaks to ‘the German’ curator on the reasons for his early exit from the Austrian institution
In further news: #MeToo flashmob at Venice Architecture Biennale; BBC historian advocates for return of British...
German museums are being pushed to diversify their canons and respond to a globalized world – but is ‘cleaning up’ the...
Sophie Fiennes’s new film Bloodlight and Bami reveals a personal side of the singer as yet unseen 
‘At last there is a communal mechanism for women to call a halt to the demeaning conventions of machismo’
The German artist has put up 18 works for sale to raise money to buy 100 homes
The novelist explored Jewish identity in the US through a lens of frustrated heterosexuality
Artist Jesse Jones, who represented Ireland at last year’s Venice Biennale, on what is at stake in Friday’s Irish...
‘I spend more time being seduced by the void … as a way of energizing my language’: poet Wayne Koestenbaum speaks about...
To experience the music of the composer, who passed away last week at the age of 69, was to hear something tense,...
In a year charged with politicized tensions, mastery of craft trumps truth-to-power commentary
In further news: women wearing rainbow badges beaten in Beijing’s 798; gallerists Georg Kargl and Richard Gray have...
‘Coping as a woman in France is a daily battle: the aggression can be subtle, and you always have to push harder to...
Toyin Ojih Odutola’s portraits of a fictional aristocratic Nigerian family push toward an expanded definition...

On View

Latest Magazines

frieze magazine

April 2018

frieze magazine

May 2018

frieze magazine

June - August 2018